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Trap Light
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Trap Light converts waste light energy from the light bulb back into functional ambient light.

Detailed Description:
Trap Light proposes a radical new approach to lighting, converting waste light energy back into visible light. Appropriating the traditional Murano glass blowing technique incamiciatura, the designers embedded photoluminescent pigments into the glass body of the lamp. Through this process, Trap Light becomes both shade and light source, emitting, absorbing, and re-emitting light. 30 minutes charge of recycled light from an incandescent or LED light bulb provides a few hours of ambient lighting.

Known drawbacks of design:
As Trap Light uses handblown glass production, the saturation of pigment within each glass is totally unique, adding to the aesthetic quality of the pieces, but meaning each piece has a slightly different glow intensity.

Website:
http://www.traplightsaveenergy.com

Designed in:
2011

Status of realization:
In production

Challenge(s):
Energy, Environment, Habitation, Lifestyle

Region of use:
Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, Oceania, South America

Form/Impact/Context

Form
In the production of Murano glass, craftsman use a traditional technique called "incamiciatura" to add coloured pigments to hand blown glass, taking a ball of molten glass from the oven, rolling the glass into the pigment before adding a second layer of glass and blowing the glass into a wooden mould to form the final product. Using this technique the designers were able to sandwich a layer of photoluminescent pigment directly inside of the glass, thus creating a material with photoluminescent properties as well as a new aesthetic quality for the pigment. 30 minutes ‘charge’ of recycled light from a traditional incandescent or LED light bulb provides a few hours of ambient light. Trap Light was thus designed in both hanging and standing versions, for both indoor and outdoor use. The addition of the steel cage added a layer of protection to the photoluminescent glass while helping to accentuate the concept of "trapping of light" within.

Impact
Trap Light was designed to make the most of our lighting energy consumption. By utilising photoluminescent pigments to capture escaping light, Trap Light converts waste energy back into visible light. In principle the photoluminescent properties of the pigments are ever lasting. According to documented laboratory tests, it is estimated that even after 25 years the material does not suffer degradation. Combining the photoluminescent pigments with glass, we therefore create a durable, long lasting material, with much potential for energy conservation. In addition, the appropriation of traditional production methods means that the photoluminescent glass can be easily produced on a local level. The next logical step for the project, therefore, is to open up our material knowledge to community or charity run projects, to manufacture low cost lighting solutions for areas of low energy or economical resources.

Context
While the incandescent light bulb is clearly not as efficient as other, contemporary lighting solutions, phasing it out has not altered our behaviour towards energy consumption, and yet, the human eye can function perfectly adequately in ambient lighting conditions. The photoluminescence of the pigments used in Trap Light are located within the Mesopic vision range. In such conditions the human eye takes between 16 to 32 seconds to adapt to the level of luminosity. Trap Light thus functions as both task and ambient light, encouraging consumers to consider when they truly need electrical light and when ambient lighting would suffice, or in fact, be more desirable. Currently Trap Light is produced as a consumer lighting solution, however, the traditional production methods offer the opportunity to further develop the material and design, manufacturing low cost lighting solutions for areas of low energy resources.

Other relevant information
There was a common aim to develop a project with a more critical approach, not just leading to a functional design outcome, but to a change in mentality or behaviour. It was this train of thought which led the designers to ask themselves the question: "Can we create a light that can recycle some of its own energy?

Business

Is the design protected by patent or ip registration?
none

How has the development of the design been financed hereunto?
Personal investment

Is there a plan for future investments?
Yes

Is there in-house competencies to secure market roll out of the design, with regards to investment, distribution, sales, etc.?
Not known

Credits

Designed by:
Mike Thompson

Title/Role:
Designer

Website:
http://www.miket.co.uk

Professional status of designer:
Active

Nationality:
United Kingdom

City/Country of residence:
Amsterdam, Netherlands

Name of company:
Mike Thompson

Designed by:
Gionata Gatto

Title/Role:
Designer

Website:
http://www.atuppertu.com/

Professional status of designer:
Active

Nationality:
Italy

City/Country of residence:
Antwerp, Belgium

Name of company:
Studio Atùppertù